• Outdoor photography at Hume Lake

    This past week I took time off from my wedding and portrait photography, returning to my outdoor photography roots. Hiking around one of my favorite places on earth, Hume Lake, California, in Sequoia National Forest, I was able to capture the beauty of God’s creation. Here are 18 of my favorite shots. Which of these connects with you?


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Redwood and sky


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Broken, 2012


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Dam, lake and sky


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Bridge, forest and sky


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Bee and flowers


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Purple thistle


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Tiny reds


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Blue jay and nuts


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Seven Deer


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Hume pond


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Water hole (at 10 mile creek)


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Lakeside bench


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Raft


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Anvils


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Anvil


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Debris


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Hume Lake at sunrise


    Hume Lake , California, by Eduardo Suastegui
    Hume Lake rock at sunrise

    I’ve been to this location and these spots so often before, this time around I told myself not to be disappointed if I didn’t capture anything unique or different. I was very pleased to discover otherwise. It goes to show that even if something has been photographed a lot — even by you! — there’s always something new to uncover and capture.

    Technical info: for these, I mostly used the Sigma 17-50 f2.8, though one of these uses the Sigma 8-16, and a couple use the Nikkor 70-200 f2.8.

    Eduardo Suastegui is a fine art photographer who serves the Los Angeles area in the cities of Downey and Whittier with his wedding and portrait photography


  • A little event, musical shooting

    What does wedding photography have to do with a local school musical? Capturing timeless moments in good light, for starters. A couple of weekends ago I had the pleasure — and I mean that — of hanging back from my seat during St. Jeanne de Lestonnac’s presentation of Oklahoma, and grabbing a few shots. The kids did a terrific job, from the singing, to the choreography, the sound, and yes, the lighting. I had a great time trying to capture a glimpse of their terrific work.

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    Eduardo Suastegui is an event and wedding photographer serving the Downey, Whittier, Los Angeles – Orange County, California area.


  • Back from Brussels and Bruges

    Here are a few photos I’ve selected so far as best-in-trip from my recent trip to Brussels and Bruges, Belgium.

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    I’ll keep mulling these over to see which if any merit specialized post-processing into a fine art print.


  • Two ways to shoot wide

    On a recent trip to Brussels, I found plenty opportunity go wide with my compositions. When I found myself with the wrong, as in not wide enough, lens while photographing the Grand Place, I decided to take a 10 frame composite with the Sigma 17-50 at 17mm. A quick stitch using my panorama software of choice gave me this image.

    Grand Place, stitched

    Just in case that didn’t turn out, I decided to not be lazy and swap in my Sigma 8-16 and get it all in one shot.

    Grand Place, wide

    I tend to prefer that second shot because I managed to compose with less of a tilt, but the two samples get the point across. If you’re caught with a not-so-wide lens, remember that there’s more than one way to get the job done.


  • Art show event coverage

    This weekend I did a little event coverage during The Spirit of Art reception at the Whittier Art Gallery. I spent most of my time, however, talking with folks about the work on display. Here are some photos I hope will give you a glimpse of the happenings. If you missed it, you can still check out the exhibit during the gallery’s regular business hours, Wednesday to Sunday, Noon to 5pm.


  • Quirky wide angles and big skies

    Though many say they don’t like it, I am a sucker for quirky wide angles, especially when big skies are involved. Here’s an favorite of mine, taken with the Nikon D80 and 10-24 lens.


    Watcher - B&W redo {Explore}

    Since then, I’ve had plenty of opportunity to explore and experiment with wide angles and the interesting perspectives they produce. Here are two recent shots, taken with the Nikon D7000. The first one uses the Sigma 17-50 f2.8 at its widest angle setting, and the second uses the Sigma 8-16.


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    Lifeguard wide

    One should be able to see the difference between the two shots. While both explore similar themes and subjects, the second is far more radical in its portrayal, and certainly less concerned with “realism” in its abandonment of vertical lines in favor of ones that “keystone.” Note also how the sky gets that radiating look in its cloud formations in the wider perspectives.

    By of further demonstration, here are two shots, one below and one above Manhattan Beach pier.


    Manhattan Beach pier, wide - B&W

    At pier's end